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Has Flipped Learning Gone Mainstream?

This past week, Aaron Sams and I had the privilege of spending the week sharing about the Flipped Learning in Western Europe.  We spent two days in the Netherlands conducting workshops and meeting with Dutch Education leaders.  We then had two days in London at the BETT conference where we were had the privilege being keynote speakers.  We spoke in the BETT arena, a 750 seat stadium they built just for the conference.  BETT is the largest Educational Technology event in Europe with an attendance of about 30,000 people.  It is mostly a trade show–however they are starting to make it more of a learning conference where good ideas about education can be shared.  

Aaron and I rarely get any time face to face with each other anymore since he is in Pittsburg and I am in Chicago, so it was a good time for us to catch up contemplate what Flipped Learning has become.  One thing we tried to analyze this question:

  • Has Flipped Learning gone mainstream?

In our keynote we had a slide where we stated that indeed, Flipped Learning has gone mainstream.  As we contemplated this question we asked:  why has it struck such a strong chord with so many educators across the globe?  I think one of the reasons is that it allows for teachers to maximize face to face time with students.  This is important because, in my opinion, good teaching (regardless of whether or not you are using flipped learning) has always been about the relationship between the teacher and her students.  And Flipped Learning creates an environment where teachers can get to know their students better, can know their strengths, weaknesses, passions, and struggles.  

I feel, with our overemphasis on standardized tests, that we have lost the human element to teaching.  Kids are not numbers–they are people–and when we treat people like…well…people, then learning will occur.

So my questions for you:  

  1. Has Flipped Learning gone mainstream?
  2. If so:  Why do you think it has struck such a strong chord with so many?

I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this.