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How Students Learn from Video

Have you ever wondered what students pay attention to when watching an instructional video? Listen to Dr. Peter Wagstaff who has some new research and theories about what keeps student attention.

1 Response

  1. Valentin Voroshilov

    FYI: the real reason for wishing to flip the classroom is a search for more effective teaching strategies WITHIN fixed time constrains. What if students had enough time to learn with a teacher (instead of watching videos) and then to work different assignments again with a teacher. That could be called “double the classroom” – every learning action would have been done in the classroom with a teacher. Possible? Only in theory – time is money and no one would “double the money”. But now we can make one step ahead. What if we make lessons in a way that every learning action would have been done in the classroom with a teacher – but within current time constrains. Most probably within one year course we would have to cut the material in half. But maybe that would worth it? The amount of the material is less and less important because it is now openly and easily available online. Plus, it is possible (at least in theory) to rethink the material spread over 4-5 years and manage it in such a way it will not need any severe cuts. So, teachers would not have to flip classroom. Teachers could fill and lead classrooms. The idea of pipping a classroom forces teachers into thinking about teaching and learning and reflecting on their practice, and making their practice more student-centered. But the same effect can be achieved by many other approaches -in fact by any approaches which “force” a teaching into a reflection (http://www.cognisity.how/2016/10/facilitating.html). And BTW: if you ask student what would they prefer – watching videos or participating in teacher guided “lecture” – the majority would chose the latter. And as a physics teacher I can assure with absolute certainty – no video or app can be as effective as a good in-class lecture-demonstration-problem-solving-peer-to-peer-teacher-guided interaction, still called by the old fashion word “a lecture”. But the teacher has to be really good (http://www.cognisity.how/2018/02/thinkphy.html).

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