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The Perfect Match: Common Core and the Flipped Classroom

Flipped learning is when you move the direct instruction from the group learning classroom
to an individual learning space.

Webb, Norman L. and others. “Web Alignment Tool” 24 July 2005. Wisconsin Center of Educational Research. University of Wisconsin-Madison. 2 Feb. 2006.

Webb, Norman L. and others. “Web Alignment Tool” 24 July 2005. Wisconsin Center of Educational Research. University of Wisconsin-Madison. 2 Feb. 2006.

With the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Standards for Science, as well as new assessments right around the corner, schools and districts are wrestling with how to prepare teachers for this change. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a vehicle to prepare students for college and career readiness.

One key shift is that students will need to provide demonstrable evidence of their knowledge in:

  • New situations,
  • Unrehearsed situations, and
  • More complex situations.

And in the Common Core Math Standards, there is a focus on:

  • Mathematical reasoning
  • Abstract reasoning
  • Use of appropriate tools, especially technological tools
  • Construction of mathematical arguments
  • The understanding of mathematical models

Learning objectives and standards are not new for teachers. They have guided our classroom lessons and tests for a long time, but now teachers need to move their students to deeper levels of understanding. As a former science teacher, I think in terms of charts. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) chart maps out four levels of cognitive complexity. The CCSS and Next Generation assessments will emphasize levels three and four, whereas most of our current instruction and assessment focus on levels one and two.

Since I wrote this with Pearson Education you will need to read the rest of the article by clicking HERE: